About

Indigenous Studies is designed to promote a comprehensive understanding of Indigenous peoples by examining Indigenous traditions, histories, languages and philosophies and their contribution to national and international communities.


Quick facts
  • Three or four year degree
  • Full or part-time program
  • You can enter this program directly from high school
  • You can begin this program off-campus

What you will learn

You will learn about Indigenous experiences, from present day challenges to pre-contact histories as you examine historical and contemporary realities of Indian, Métis and Inuit societies in Canada. You will learn the historic and contemporary Indigenous perspectives that guide their interactions with other Indigenous people and non-Indigenous people as you explore the similarities and differences experienced by Indigenous societies within their community and around the world.

A first-year schedule sample

This degree program is flexible and offers you the opportunity to take courses in many different subject areas. Here’s what a typical first-year schedule might look like:

CourseDescription

Fall Term
INDG 107 Introduction to Canadian Indigenous Studies
POLS 111* Democratic Citizenship in Canada
PSY 121* Social Clinical Cultural and Developmental Bases of Psychology
CREE 110* nehiyawetan Let Us Speak Cree
GEOG 125* Environmental Science and Society

Winter Term
SOC 112* Foundations in Sociology Social Construction of Everyday Life
HIST 125* History Matters Indigenous Colonial and Post colonial Histories
INDG 262* Aboriginal Narratives of Historical Memory
CMPT 120* Digital Document Processing
ENG 114* Literature and Composition Reading Culture

* These are elective courses. You will be able to choose from a variety of electives based on your interests.

The Course and Program Catalogue has the complete and official listing of required classes and their descriptions for this program.

INDG 210: Indigenous Ways of Knowing
This course introduces students to the rich and complex natures, forms and diversities of Indigenous Knowledge in comparative and local contexts. The focus will be on the relevance of local/traditional/Indigenous knowledge to decolonization, environmental sustainability, and self-governance.

INDG 373: Indigenous Masculinities in the Global Context
Though the literature on masculinity has increased dramatically in the last 15 years, researchers have only recently begun to explore the notion of Indigenous masculinities. The majority of research has emerged in the pacific islands and Africa, but has garnered sparse attention in North America. Through articles and books, lectures, class discussion, and written assignments, this course will introduce students to the issues of masculinity from global Indigenous perspectives and provide an introduction to the general masculinity literature. The course will explore to what degree the notions of masculinity in general, and global Indigenous masculinities specifically, applies to the North American context.

INDG 410: Aboriginal Self Determination Through Mitho Pimachesowin Ability to Make a Good Living
The course examines a range of contemporary issues relating to the conceptual foundations of Aboriginal Self Determination. Historically, the Aboriginal Way of Life had spiritual roots and encompassed all of life, and this holistic perspective continues to influence modern developments in varying degrees. This class will introduce students to the Cree concept of Mitho Pimachesowin (ability to make a good living) and its application to contemporary initiatives in Aboriginal Self Determination. It will also explore its related elements of autonomy, kinship, work ethic, respect, responsibility and resilience.

Location
Teaching and research are well grounded in the priorities and knowledge of Saskatchewan’s Aboriginal communities, all the while placing them within the larger fabric of the Canadian Aboriginal experience and the emergent global, social phenomenon of indigeneity.

Careers

Some career opportunities include:

  • Community educator
  • Researcher
  • Teacher
  • Environmental advisor
  • Community liaison worker
  • Policy advisor
  • Aboriginal issues coordinator
  • Youth worker
  • Corrections officer
  • Journalist
  • Mediator
  • Employment counsellor
  • Cultural anthropologist
  • Communications officer
  • Economic development manager
  • Liaison officer
  • Advocate
  • Political analyst

Tuition estimates

Canadian studentsInternational students
Tuition $6,347 $17,327
Fees $922 $922
Books $1,500 $1,500
Total $8,769 $19,749

Tuition will vary depending on the type and number of classes you take in a year. This estimate reflects a typical amount you could expect to pay in your first year if you enroll in a full course load, the maximum number of courses allowed (2018-2019 Canadian dollar rates).
Fees are used to fund specific student benefits, including health, vision and dental coverage, a bus pass, recreational programs and fitness centre access.
The cost of books and supplies varies widely depending on the courses you choose. It is recommended that you budget between $1,000-$2,000 per year.

Program options

These Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Indigenous Studies degrees are offered by the University of Saskatchewan's College of Arts and Science:

  • Bachelor of Arts Four-year
  • Bachelor of Arts Three-year
  • Bachelor of Arts Honours
  • Bachelor of Arts Double Honours 

You should consult with an academic advisor in the college when you begin your studies to decide if you want a four-year, three-year or honours degree.

Admission requirements and deadlines

Deadlines

Start term Application DeadlineInternational Deadline
Winter
January 2019
Dec 1, 2018
Documents due: Dec 15, 2018
Sep 1, 2018
Documents due: Oct 1, 2018
Spring
May 2019
Apr 1, 2019
Documents due: May 1, 2019
Feb 1, 2019
Documents due: Mar 1, 2019
Summer
July 2019
May 1, 2019
Documents due: Jun 1, 2019
Mar 1, 2019
Documents due: Apr 1, 2019
Fall
September 2019
May 1, 2019
Documents due: Jun 1, 2019
May 1, 2019
Documents due: Jun 1, 2019
Winter
January 2020
Dec 1, 2019
Documents due: Dec 15, 2019
Sep 1, 2019
Documents due: Oct 1, 2019

Ready to apply?

A non-refundable application fee of $90 CDN is required before your application will be processed.

Stay connected

Do you want us to send you important reminders, information about our programs or notifications about uSask events?